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20131105
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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
nsa programs that included spying on foreign leaders in a house intelligence hearing today. in the testimony, national intelligence director james clapper and nsa director keith alexander says data collected was provided to the nsa by other country's intelligence agencies. this hearing is chaired by michigan congressman mike rogers. [inaudible conversations] >> i'll only accept the decorum and only those recognized to speak. i'd like to welcome the first pam today, director of the national intelligence, james clapper, deputy attorney general james cole, national security agency director, keith alexander, deputy director of the nsa, chris england. following the first panel, moving immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing is an open forum to discuss potential amendments to the foreign intelligence surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how propos
intelligence james clapper james clapper,, deputy attorney the deputyes cole, director of the nsa, chris inglis. we will move immediately into the second panel of non- governmental experts knowledgeable on fisa issues. we will discuss possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice. i hope all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how proposals under consideration at congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks. i am going to submit my statement for the record in order to ask some questions following the opening statement and your opening statements in relation to some of the news of the day to get some things clarified for the record. it will be important for the american people. .e do expect a vote we will hold as long as we can. we will take a brief intermission. there are only two votes. we should be able to recess or a short time and return. i will recognize any opening comment. for comingu, panel, here today. hopefully, we will get the facts on the table and let the american people understand what we do and how we do it.
to hear about the tech giants and nsa spying. google says it's outraged. this is "around the world" on cnn. i'm suzanne malveaux. >> i'm michael homes. thanks for your company today. welcome to our international viewers. >> waiting for the white house briefing, they'll respond to the latest nsa spying allegations and expect to comment on the problems with the obama care website. live as soon as it happens. keep a close eye on the white house. >>> we're all familiar with when you get on the plane, shut off your cell phone, turn off the gadgets, anything with a power button, turn it off. it's been that way for years but things are about to change. at least in the u.s. >> yes. federal airline officials made this big announcement today. just a couple of hours ago. looks like the airline's going to have to change the preflight videos. >> clear. insert mobile phones and electronic devices are turned off. if you're -- >> i love that little video there. delta, chris lawrence, reagan national airport. i'm one of the people in the back of the plane on my phone trying to get the last bit in here, if
♪ >>> hello, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz, live in new york. >> the nsa denies reports president obama knew about and approved the spying on germany's chancellor. >> after months held hostage farc frees a u.s. marine. >> syria submits a plan for getting rid of its chemical weapons three days before the deadline. >> remembering rock pioneer lou reed. the former velvet underground died at the age of 71, today. [ ♪ theme ] >>> international uproar over reports the u.s. spied on germany's chancellor is not going away. there are claims president obama knew about the phone taps and approved them - the white house says it is not true. we are getting reports that the eavesdropping started in 2002, before angela merkel was elected. >> this morning senator jeanne shaheen called on the nsa to come clear on the surveillance program. >> i think the revelations from edward snowden, and secrets that are revealed are doing damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, mexico and other countries where the suggestion is that we've lisped in -- listened in. i think we hav
the world. this has been making big news abroad. the directors of national intelligence and the nsa will testify on capitol hill today about u.s. surveillance at home and around the world. >> meanwhile, president obama has ordered a review of intelligence gathering outside of the country where as hala says, this has been big news, trying to calm what has become an international diplomatic storm. here's his take. >> that's why i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> let's bring in elyse la by the at the state department. here's the question that not just in the united states but outside of the united states people have. what can you tell us about president obama possibly ordering the nsa to stop spy ong leaders of allied states and did he know this spying was going on when it was indeed happening? >> well, in terms of what he knew and when he knew it, none of us really know. the white house is saying that president obama knew this summer when an internal review that was started revealed that this was happ
need to bring more oversight into what is going on at nsa? i support aggressive oversight of the intelligence community. this is the deal we struck as a country. we have democracy. it is not necessarily completely in harmony with an aggressive intelligence community. we have had to set up institutions and structures where we try to balance these competing national interest. in thethe ways we did it 70's was to create intelligence communities and ensure that all --bers of each community was ultimately it is the president's call. they help make a judgment about what politically we are able to achieve in terms of intelligence collection. . host: if you have questions for our guest, you can call in on the phone lines -- if you want to send us an e- .ail, journal@c-span.org we will take those momentarily. michael allen speaking global strategy hearing d.c.. he is also an author of "linking red." has intelligence gathering and sharing got better after 9/11? guest: absolutely. we have rebuilt the intelligence infrastructure so we can share information better. this is what my book
by the n.s.a. because a few numbers may solve an authorized investigation. supporters of bulk collection practices have defended this program as an important tool in the fight against terror. they have said that this is a mechanism to access the logs quickly and they are not actually listening to the content. president obama even said, and i'll quote, "when it comes to telephone calls, nobody is listening to your telephone call. instead, the government was just sifting through this so-called met aadata" madam president, the president is right. they are not listening to the actual calls like the f.b.i. conducting a wire tavment but let me outline that the government can figure out what is going on i from those call logs. for example, they will know that an american citizen in nevada received a call from the local n.r.a. office and then called their representative and senators. but they claim that the content of that call remains safe from government intrusion. or they'll also know that a nevadan from las vegas called a suicide prevention hotline and spoke to an individual for 12 minutes.
you about afghanistan. but i want to start with the dustup over the n.s.a. allegedr our, you know, espionage of friends and allies around the world. >> still alleged? pretty muchit is acknowledged. i tried to get an explicit acknowledgement out of the and they haven't gone that far. >> what was the apology for if haven't acknowledged it? anyway. about angelament merkel is that the united states is not and will not be in on her phone conversations. there was never any statement about the past tense. was always current, future. did you know this was going on? you got all of the security -- specifically. i think the most that i would have known would have been the would have been the intelligence assessments. saying specifically where they came from. in other words, it could be say, well, that the source of assessment would be high level officials, for instance, in a country. but you don't know that was one on one or transferred anonymously in conversation. whether it was overheard. the source is -- they don't describe in the reports that we get that so and so's phone was -- conversa
there is a dangerous addiction to the remote warfare. lot nsa has been doing a avoiding putting troops on the ground and it always reminds me but war is so dangerous often it is perceived from cold hearted this and i think the worst american is to minimize the danger in damage that conflict does and one of those is the reliance on remote forms of technology to compensate our willingness to put troops on the ground. one of the only things that stops human beings from fighting is they have had a tough if you outsource to robots to create a precedent we can tell anybody anytime across the planet provided it meets us it could bounce back at some point. >> host: i see that. it a related question is clap conflicts in the past are relevant to the world you forsythe and what countries our best placed because of their experiences that they intend to it will translate to what comes next. with iraq or afghanistan it is hard to realize how good people have got and what they are doing. it is only in the realms of special forces. the capability not only of the ad agencies and a state department is unparalleled in
national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> is a tough time for nsa. we say, it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today, telling you why we defended these programs, then having given them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa surveillance programs. 10:00 a.m.rning at eastern. live sunday on c-span 2. kelly.lls for kitty on c-span 3 "american history tv," each weekend in november, remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts. john foster dulles had recently died when that super airport out of chantilly, virginia was being built. president eisenhower announced the airport would be named dulles airport. when kennedy took over, he did not want to name that for a crusty old warrior. finally, the decision was made to name it after dulles. you can still see the clip of kennedy opening the airport with eisenhower there and allen dulles
? intelligence officials assume we will over correct this. there will be a move to really constrain what the nsa and our andlligence agencies do talksf the 9/11 report about it. quite sure, it can go too far. -- >> sure. we are not anywhere near going to far. the pendulum can go to far. the whole nsa metadata issue is hard and fast. give you my views on it but nonetheless, i have not seen the pendulum swing too far yet. >> i have spoken to some officials, some off the record -- >> i don't think he's unstable. very friendly conversations, first of all. he's very direct, some of the about us ande said our people. i don't understand politics, by the way. why is he saying things that make it either on likely, less less likely,ikely, what's the politics? i don't get it. on the politician. forsee they say things public consumption -- i'm the politician. i know it's rare. once in a great while the politician will say something for the public that they don't exactly believe themselves or would say differently. why is he saying the things? the conversation i want to emphasize is that they are friendly, v
in the damage assessment on edward snowden, the n.s.a. contractor who leaked classified documents about america's secret electronic surveillance programs. >> mike morell: i do not believe he was a whistleblower. i do not believe he is a hero. i think he has betrayed his country. >> miller: how serious a hit is that to national security? >> morell: i think this is the most serious leak-- the most serious compromise of classified information in the history of the u.s. intelligence community. >> miller: because of the amount of it? or the type? >> morell: the amount and the type. >> miller: but of the hundreds of pages of n.s.a. documents that snowden has leaked, morell pointed to one in particular that has caused a great deal of damage to u.s. intelligence. it's a copy of the top secret document the c.i.a. calls its" black budget." what value would that have to an adversary? >> morell: the real damage of leaking that document was that certainly they could focus their counter-intelligence efforts on those places where we're being successful and not have to worry as much about those places where we
in the "wall street journal" president obama did not know about the nsa spying on our allies. also, last night on "60 minutes" mass confusion in libya was documented. tonight the factor will analyze both stories with brit hume. >> i think things have gotten so bad inside iraq from the standpoint the iraqi people my belief is we will in fact be greeted as liberators. >> former vice president dick cheney makes his first appearance in the no spin zone. we will talk to him about iraq, afghanistan, and how he came back from near death. >> pinhead or patriot? >> i like him. >> you like him. >> i like him. >> you don't know who the vice president of the united states is. >> no. but i know the president though. >> you should be proud. >> also up ahead watters world pinhead and patriots. >> that's a very seductive look. >> caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. thanks for watching us tonight. i don't want to know. that is the subject of this eveningens talking points memo. as we reported last week there are at least half a dozen major controversies inside the oba
about the drone attacks. the nsa revelations have undermined some confidence. now, there's a number of different reasons, but i think what i'm going to do is point out the reasons why i think we have not had as much success as we had hoped in terms of building broad support for our campaign and, second, what we ought to do about it. i think the reasons why are fairly clear. number one, as i mentioned, is the drone strikes. it has gotten a fair amount of attention. you know, the number of civilian casualties, the justification for those attacks. the world is focused on this. now, i do believe that drones are getting an unfair portion of the blame here. a drone is a weapon of war. i don't think the rest of the world would feel any better if we were launching cruise missiles from out in the ocean. i don't think that changes it. there's a little too much of an emphasis on how this has fundamentally changed things, that a drone is more dangerous than sending in a seal team on launching a bunch of cruise missiles. they're not the perfect instrument they are sometimes described to be, and
clapper and nsa direct or general keith allen discussed the nsa surveillance program and spying on foreign governments before the house intelligence committee hearing earlier this week. >> i never expected to write an entire book on cancer until i was diagnosed at a relatively young age. i was diagnosed at 36. i was astonished at how different i thought it was -- how different i was going through treatment than what i had heard about cancer and what i expected cancer be. and i sort of expected it -- i expected it to run like a well oiled machine in which cure wasn't obviously guaranteed, but people knew about my particular cancer at be followed and what i found was being really, really different. i couldn't help but i started to write about it. >> the head of the wrecks on trans next round of talks, george washington university hosted regional experts were monday. a farmer winning presidential candidate and former official at the american embassy in a rant to our commenting on prospects for the agreement. the impact of president rouhani election. nuclear weapons talks begin on november 7.
of state john kerry weighs in on the spy activities of the national security agency, saying the n.s.a. went too far. >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm david shuster, here is a look at the headlines - witnesses describe chaos in terminal 3 of los angeles international airport after a gunman opened fire this morning morning. this video from tmz showed people running after hearing the shots. an agent was killed. several others were wounded. the federal bureau of investigation identified the gunman as 23-year-old paul ciancia of pennsville new jersey. president obama said he and nouri al-maliki, iraqi prime minister shook hands and discussed how the two can work together to fight al qaeda. nouri al-maliki is seeking military aid from the united states to fight the sebbing tare have been violence. >> a u.s. drone missile attack killed this man, hakimullah mehsud, one of the c.i.a.'s most wanted men. the u.s. accused him of killing thousands, and put a $5 million bounty on his head. hakimullah mehsud was suspected of planning an attack killing employees at a u.s. base in afghanistan. th
. >> congratulations, senator. welcome. [cheers and applause] [applause] >> this is a tough time for nsa where they said, what are you doing or why are you doing it? here's what we do. when we get together, we don't -- well, maybe a couple times we whine -- but we actually say it is much more important for this country that we defend the nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attackedded. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs than having begin them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa's surveillance program on a house intelligence committee hearing. saturday morning at ten eastern. live sunday on c-span2, your calls and comments for kitty kelly, best selling author of unauthorized biographies, nancy reagan, the british royal family, the bush family, and others at noon on booktv's "in-depth," and on c-span3's american history tv, each weekend in november, remembering john f. kennedy, eyewit
is the from page of the "washington post" on the latest involving those leaks from former nsa contractor edward snowden. host: if you want to read more on that story, that is the front page of the "washington post." the front page of today's "usa just a little bit from that piece. host: that story in today's "usa today." on this subject of the hearings yesterday, play more calls and comments, some e-mails coming in. if you watched the hearing, you know a lot more about how wonderful it is that millions more will be covered. ,ecretary sebelius was direct and the congress representatives showed their hate and anger and. mona this morning -- hate and ignorance. mona this morning e-mailing entered we go to stanley on our line for democrats. good morning. caller: happy thursday. enemy and it is us. it is amazing be caller's and a lack of knowledge. i mean, they are basically regurgitating partyline talking points. we need to do a lot more research and a lot more looking into the real facts. i think sebelius did an excellent job of answering the questions. by the way, i think history will rate
that nsa leaker edward snowden could be granted clemency. i want to bring in benjamin carden. senator carden, glad to have you here, sir. >> alex, good to be with you. >> edward snowden released what he called this manifesto for the truth. he says current debates about spying just prove his revelations are helping bring about change. what's your response to that? >> mr. snowden has caused real damage to this country. the manner in which he has conducted these releases have compromised our national security. as senator feinstein said, there's a way in which a whistleblower can get information to us. we want to make sure there's adequate oversight on the powers of the intelligence community. we need the right balance to keep us safe and protect the rights of americans. so there's concern on how we collect data, but for a person who has been given that access and trust on his own to do this type of release is detrimental to our country. >> sir, as you serve on the senate foreign relations committee, i know you're privy to things we are not necessarily. do you believe what we know so far
- called nsa spying concerns. do you have an update, and do you think these meetings have improve relations between the u.s. and the eu? >> there's no question that the kind of communication we have had with the european allies have been very important and very useful when it comes to making clear how much we value the kind of security cooperation that our nations have and that we have with europe in general. comes toal when it keeping americans safe, when it comes to keeping our european allies safe. there are the tensions that of been caused by these disclosures are ones that we knowledge and ones that we are addressing directly in our communications with european nations and other nations who have been part of the disclosures. >> [indiscernible] >> i would not speak for any european nation or any other allied nation, but we believe the kind of medication that we have engaged in has been effective and useful in making we value those relationships, how important our cooperation is when it comes to national security issues and intelligence matters and how much more broad our relations veryb
-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa's surveillance program in a house committee. -- kelley,elly author of biographies. .nd american history tv remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts of the assassination. sunday at 3 p.m. eastern. >> president obama met with iraqi prime minister to talk about the partition between the u.s. and iraq. he addressed the syrian civil war and iran's nuclear program. this is about 20 minutes. >> all set? all set? i want to welcome back prime minister maliki to the white house. it's been two years since the last u.s. troops left from iraq, but the strategic partnership between our two countries remains very strong. we honor the lives that were lost, both american and iraqi, to bring about a functioning democracy in a country that previously had been ruled by a vicious dictator. and we appreciate prime minister maliki's commitment to honoring that sacrifice by ensuring a strong, prosperous, inclusive and democratic iraq. >> [speaker translates] >> we had a wide-ranging discussion about economic issues, regional issues, and security issues. [speaker tr
if they will be charged. the cause is still under investigation. nsa leaker edward snowden has a message for the u.s. stop treating me like a trader. -- traitor. snowden is under temporary asylum in russia for leaking the nsa's secret playbook and faces espionage charges in the u.s. tucker. >> hey, clayton what needs to be done to prevent these kind of attacks. jonathan gillian. thank you for joining thus morning. >> good to be with you. >> i want to put up on the scene -- screen. there have been couple of shootings. gunman killed himself in houston. 2010, new orleans, one dead, one wounded and famously in los angeles 2002, two dead and three wounded. do you see a pattern here? >> well, obviously we see a pattern of individuals that are drawn to this for some reason. i'm not exactly clear why people who have rage are drawn to this. but, yeah, we definitely do see an issue with this. and i think probably one of the things that allows people to go there and do or draws them there is the access to the airport. and the importance of the airport. so they probably look at this as something that almost like a go
calling this president a liar because so many things, you know, benghazi, the n.s.a., the i.r.s., and now this whole health care bill is such a farce. it is a joke. guest: can you tell me what the president lied about when it comes to benghazi? caller: the first thing, we don't know what he was doing. guest: no, we're talking about lying. you said the president was lying about benghazi. can you give an example? caller: everybody covers for him. he doesn't have to answer for anything. all he ever does, he's out campaigning all the time and he's supposed to be a president. i'd like to ask you, why is he a president? he doesn't lead. he doesn't do anything. all he does is go out there and agitate people. he's a community agitator. he has divided this country and we don't want anything part of your leftist progressive views. host: let's give him a chance to respond. guest: well, i don't know how to respond to that. she wanted to talk about lying but she didn't have an example. if you want to get into this stuff, i think you need to be -- have some specifics. but she says the president doesn't
for nsa. everybody says what are you doing or why are you doing it? but here's what we do. when we get when we get together -- well maybe a couple of times we've wine, but we actually say it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings than it is to give up a program would result in a nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs and having given them up and having the nation or the allies. they defended the program and the house intelligence committee meeting. saturday morning at ten eastern. blasÉ sunday at c-span2 your calls and comments >> asad nassa's future goes, so too does that of america. if nassa is healthy, then you don't need a program to convince people that science and engineering is good to do because you will see it at large on the paper. it will be called for engineers to help us go ice fishing where there is an ocean of water that has been liquid for billions of years. we will dig through the soil and look for life that will give me the best biologists. look
-- ns -- n.s.a. and sinced at administration has said there was unspecified inaccuracies in these reports about the revelations, can you say that that was what you were talking about? >> you want to specify what the unspecified inaccuracies might be? we have important cooperative relationships with the security agencies and intelligence agencies of other nations, of allied nations. i'm not going to get into the specific alleged activities, intelligence activities, of the united states or our allies. we're obviously more broadly engaged in a review as i discussed at length yesterday of our intelligence gathering activities, mindful of the fact that because of the explosion in our technological capacities , we need to look at and make sure that we are not just gathering intelligence because we can, but we're gathering it because we need it specifically and that review is under way at the president's direction and will be completed by the end of the year. >> one of the things that officials say of the review is the surveillance of allied heads of state. is the administration
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)

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